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ALBUM REVIEW: DevotchKa

100 Lovers
100 Lovers
Courtesy Anti- Records

DevotchKa, derived from the Russian word meaning “girl”, is one of those rare bands that not only scores a film in your mind, but also directs, stars in, and produces it. Leading man Nick Urata's haunting cadence soars over each song as if they were revolving cinematic contexts, scene after scene in a film. From the beginning of 100 Lovers melancholy keys draw us into waves of warm euphoric orchestration in “The Alley” only to drown more sorrowfully into the jaunty sway of “All the Sand in all the Sea.” The first two tracks are by no means the extent of the bands weaving of styles utterly visual, which somehow makes for them the best candidate for inclusion in X-Box ad campaigns. Of the many styles found on 100 Lovers is presented with the band's unique organic delivery, including gypsy, campy folk, and flamenco.

The cast of supporting characters employ everything from a Brazilian berimbau to a children's choir in order take on the richly eclectic textures. One look at the album's Dali-esque cover art and it's clear why Talking Heads frontman David Byrne and Thom Yorke's alleged go-to percussionist were tapped to guest on this album. DevotchKa's real allure isn't just the expanse of their influences, but moreover that a sound that borrows so freely from ethnic styles comes from a quartet out of Denver, Colorado. For an introduction to DevotchKa's film scoring endeavors, complete with Grammy nod, please consult the Little Miss Sunshine Soundtrack.

DevotchaKa perform at the Belly Up Tavern Friday, March 11. 100 Lovers is out now on Anti- Records